NaNoWriMo 2017 Day 12


Words written today: 5,031. Running total: 20,414.

Actually, that’s a three-day total of sorts. As I predicted, Friday turned out to be a total non-starter. I did a decent chunk of writing on Saturday, but didn’t blog about it or even update my counter. Still, after a few sessions spread over Sunday, I’m back on track word-count wise. I didn’t get around to building my tracking spreadsheet for the novel, but that can wait. This week I’m jumping on and off planes a lot (even by my standards), so I’ll have to try and make my time in air productive.

NaNoWriMo Day 8

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Words written today: 1,709. Running total: 13,643.

Keeping the pace, with another 1,700-odd words completed, in line with the day 8 goal of 13,600 or so. Something I need to factor in: this year, I actually write faster with a pair of 1-hour slots than with a single 2-hour marathon. Time for some calendar jigging!

NaNoWriMo 2017 Day 7

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Words written today: 1,716. Running total: 11,934.

I wrote half of today’s words on a plane, half in my lunch break and in a quick dash after work, and then headed out to a Pretenders/Steve Nicks concert. Not bad hey?

NaNoWriMo 2017 Day 6

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Words written today: 5,096. Running total: 10,218.

This is clearly going to be a stop-start NaNoWriMo for me. I’m now slightly ahead of the scheduled target of 10,200 words, but I did basically no work on the weekend. So I’ve hit that target due to an extra (planned) day off work and a marathon writing and planning session.

It’s definitely not the ideal way to produce a novel. On the upside, I now have so many different chapters and elements sketched out that there should always be something for me to dive in on during the week. So my simple goal for the next three days is the make sure I hit the 1,700 words per day target on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Friday already looks questionable but we’ll see!

NaNoWriMo 2017 Day 2


Words written today: 1,704. Running total: 5,122.

I was correct in my assumption that I would get no writing done on the day of the Finder Awards. But I’m back on track today, knocking out my required 1,704 words in a little under 90 minutes. In an ideal world, I’d get even further ahead, but life is busy. And I’m happy that I nailed a crucial plot insight.

NaNoWriMo 2017 Day 1: Smashing targets

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Words written today: 3,418

The daily target is 1,700 words, so I’ve well and truly smashed that – but there’s a reason. Tomorrow we have the 2017 Finder Awards, and I calculate I will have zero opportunity for writing. So I’m knocking off enough to cover the first two days.

Writing more is usually easier at the start of a NaNoWriMo project, because all the ideas you’ve been mulling in the run-up come pouring out. That said, it was a long work day and I really had to push myself to dive into writing. Got there in the end though.

NaNoWriMo 2017: Let the journey begin!

So once again I’m taking part in NaNoWriMo, otherwise known as National Novel Writing Month, otherwise known as trying to write a complete novel of at least 50,000 words in 30 days. I have successfully completed NaNoWriMo three times before, but I’ve failed nearly as often, including last year. Nonetheless, I’ll be taking a crack at it again in 2017.

I have an idea, I’ve blocked out two hours in my calendar every day (with extra sessions on days when that just seems not doable), and I’m excited to begin. I’ll be posting daily updates here, mainly because I want a degree of public accountability and it’s too hard to fit everything into a single tweet.

To reach 50,000 words, I need to write 1,700 words every day. So I’ll be tracking how much I write each day and what my total is. And I’ll be offering random observations about the process. Let the novel drafting commence! (Well, it can commence on November 1. Starting earlier would be cheating.)

United Airlines’ use of language demonstrates what a deadshit company it is

Everyone is horrified by how United Airlines has treated a paying passenger it decided to kick off a plane after he had boarded. One minor but chilling aspect of the horror? How United’s own comments abuse what language actually means to try and justify its shitty behaviour.

The two standout examples of United spin:

  • The tweet from United suggests that it had to “re-accommodate” customers. That is not what the phrase means.
  • The letter sent to staff talks about how United “denied boarding” for the passenger. As the video makes clear, he had already boarded and been assigned a seat, before some late-running crew were given priority. To suggest this equals “denying boarding” is Orwellian in its warping of reality.

No, this doesn’t suck as much as an already crappy US airline deciding to use government-funded forces to make a passenger bleed as it drags him off the plane because it’s too cheap to organise proper staff rosters. But it underscores why no sane person would ever fly with United again. Your ticket literally isn’t worth the paper it’s (possibly) printed on.

Update: the sequel apology was equally crap, including the phrase “No-one should ever be mistreated this way.” Mistreated in any other way would be OK then, right?

Update: I ended up writing a longer version of this for Lifehacker.